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10-Week Fitness Challenge

What to Expect

In this program you will go through 10 weeks of workouts, 5 days per week. Workouts will change every two weeks and progress in intensity to promote muscle toning and getting lean. I'm happy to be your trainer and resource throughout this program. I want you to get the most out of it.

This program is designed mainly for women who are ready for a fun avenue to practice a healthy exercise routine with challenging workouts, a flexible schedule, plenty of motivation and accountability. The goal at the end of the 10 weeks (or however many times you choose to stick with the program) is more than just for fitness. The goal is also to promote a positive self-image and enhance your quality of life. I'm excited for you to reap the rewards of working hard!

An important part of this program is the community and accountability that are built in. You will be a part of a community who can hold each other accountable... this is the driving force of what will make you all most successful. We are doing this as a group! You will be a part of a community that encourages, helps motivate and holds one another accountable.

Take advantage of it. Be a part of it! Use it to build up others!

 

The program layout is organized into five steps. When you're ready to start, you can access the five steps using the buttons on the right. Every two weeks you will start a new set of five workouts to complete each week. So, you'll do five different workouts in week one and repeat them in week two. Then you'll receive five new workouts to complete in week three and repeat those in week four. So on and so forth. I recommend reading through the workouts in advance, watching the exercise tutorials and asking me any questions you might have ahead of time.

I know you're probably ready to jump right in, but before you do, scroll down for my best tips for getting started in the week leading up to workout one.

Carly's Tips for Getting Started

FOR THE WEEK LEADING UP TO YOUR FIRST WORKOUT, I'VE PREPARED THESE TIPS TO HELP YOU GET THE MOST OUT OF THIS 10-WEEK FITNESS PROGRAM:

PREPARATION TIP #1

Get motivated to start an exercise routine again if you've recently take a hiatus. The best way to do this and stay safe is to get back to basics with a focus on exercise form with every repetition!

 

When you hit the gym next week remember that you will likely need to use light weights to practice perfect form. Even if you used to be able to lift heavier weights perfectly, After a pause in exercise activity or before a new level of exercising, your muscles will need to learn or relearn how to lift heavier safely.

Find an appropriate weight to use for each exercise (more on that in prep tips #2) and practice perfect form as if you would win $$ for each perfectly completed repetition.

PREPARATION TIP #2

Find an appropriate weight to use for each exercise. My rule of thumb for finding an appropriate weight to use for a given exercise goes like this: 

 

Let’s say the exercise is to complete 3 sets of 15 repetitions. Choose a weight you think you could complete the 15 with (or ask me for a recommendation). 

 

Do one set of the exercise. If you completed the 15 repetitions with great form and feel like you could keep going to do 5+ more repetitions, the weights was too light. Increase the weight during your rest and then do set 2. Continue increasing the weight each set until you find the weight that you can complete (with good form) the 15 reps with but only feel like you could MAYBE do AT MOST 2 more reps if your life depended on it. That is the perfect weight to use. It should be challenging but your form should not be sacrificed. If you cannot reach the recommended number of repetitions and find yourself sacrificing form, stop the set, decrease the weight, finish your rest break, and use the lighter weight to complete the next set. This can often mean starting with no added weight (aka body weight). This is a no judgment zone.

PREPARATION TIP #3

Find an appropriate weight to use for each exercise. My rule of thumb for finding an appropriate weight to use for a given exercise goes like this: 

 

Let’s say the exercise is to complete 3 sets of 15 repetitions. Choose a weight you think you could complete the 15 with (or ask me for a recommendation). 

 

Do one set of the exercise. If you completed the 15 repetitions with great form and feel like you could keep going to do 5+ more repetitions, the weights was too light. Increase the weight during your rest and then do set 2. Continue increasing the weight each set until you find the weight that you can complete (with good form) the 15 reps with but only feel like you could MAYBE do AT MOST 2 more reps if your life depended on it. That is the perfect weight to use. It should be challenging but your form should not be sacrificed. If you cannot reach the recommended number of repetitions and find yourself sacrificing form, stop the set, decrease the weight, finish your rest break, and use the lighter weight to complete the next set. This can often mean starting with no added weight (aka body weight). This is a no judgment zone.

PREPARATION TIP #4

Find an appropriate weight to use for each exercise. My rule of thumb for finding an appropriate weight to use for a given exercise goes like this: 

 

Let’s say the exercise is to complete 3 sets of 15 repetitions. Choose a weight you think you could complete the 15 with (or ask me for a recommendation). 

 

Do one set of the exercise. If you completed the 15 repetitions with great form and feel like you could keep going to do 5+ more repetitions, the weights was too light. Increase the weight during your rest and then do set 2. Continue increasing the weight each set until you find the weight that you can complete (with good form) the 15 reps with but only feel like you could MAYBE do AT MOST 2 more reps if your life depended on it. That is the perfect weight to use. It should be challenging but your form should not be sacrificed. If you cannot reach the recommended number of repetitions and find yourself sacrificing form, stop the set, decrease the weight, finish your rest break, and use the lighter weight to complete the next set. This can often mean starting with no added weight (aka body weight). This is a no judgment zone.

PREPARATION TIP #5

Find an appropriate weight to use for each exercise. My rule of thumb for finding an appropriate weight to use for a given exercise goes like this: 

 

Let’s say the exercise is to complete 3 sets of 15 repetitions. Choose a weight you think you could complete the 15 with (or ask me for a recommendation). 

 

Do one set of the exercise. If you completed the 15 repetitions with great form and feel like you could keep going to do 5+ more repetitions, the weights was too light. Increase the weight during your rest and then do set 2. Continue increasing the weight each set until you find the weight that you can complete (with good form) the 15 reps with but only feel like you could MAYBE do AT MOST 2 more reps if your life depended on it. That is the perfect weight to use. It should be challenging but your form should not be sacrificed. If you cannot reach the recommended number of repetitions and find yourself sacrificing form, stop the set, decrease the weight, finish your rest break, and use the lighter weight to complete the next set. This can often mean starting with no added weight (aka body weight). This is a no judgment zone.

PREPARATION TIP #6

Find an appropriate weight to use for each exercise. My rule of thumb for finding an appropriate weight to use for a given exercise goes like this: 

 

Let’s say the exercise is to complete 3 sets of 15 repetitions. Choose a weight you think you could complete the 15 with (or ask me for a recommendation). 

 

Do one set of the exercise. If you completed the 15 repetitions with great form and feel like you could keep going to do 5+ more repetitions, the weights was too light. Increase the weight during your rest and then do set 2. Continue increasing the weight each set until you find the weight that you can complete (with good form) the 15 reps with but only feel like you could MAYBE do AT MOST 2 more reps if your life depended on it. That is the perfect weight to use. It should be challenging but your form should not be sacrificed. If you cannot reach the recommended number of repetitions and find yourself sacrificing form, stop the set, decrease the weight, finish your rest break, and use the lighter weight to complete the next set. This can often mean starting with no added weight (aka body weight). This is a no judgment zone.

Feeling Ready?

Jump to Weeks
1 & 2
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